Fentress County

The county was established in 1823 from Morgan, Overton, and White counties and is named in honor of James Fentress.

Historic Sites

Photo of First National Bank
First National Bank - Huntsville, TN

The First National Bank of Huntsville was listed on the NRHP in 1985 for its association with the commercial history of the town of Huntsville. Built in 1909, the vernacular style commercial building is constructed of sandstone blocks.

Photo of Sgt. Alvin C. York State Historic Park
Sgt. Alvin C. York State Historic Park - Pall Mall, TN

The Alvin C. York Historic District was listed on the NRHP in 1973 for its association with famed World War I hero Sgt. Alvin C. York. The historic district lies within the Pall Mall community on roughly 680 acres and contains several buildings and sites, associated with the life of York. The district includes: The Francis Asbury Williams House, John Frogge House, York Springs Erasmus Pile House, Marriage Rock, York’s First House, Wolf River Methodist Church, Williams-Pile House, Post Office, York Chapel, York Bible School, York Grist Mill, Sgt. York Home. The Alvin Cullom York Farm was listed as a National Historic Landmark (NHL) in 1973 for its association with famed World War I hero Sgt. Alvin C. York. Located off U.S. Highway 127 near Pall Mall, the Alvin Cullom York Farm includes 16 acres that contain York’s post-World War I home, built in 1922, and nine outbuildings. York resided in this house until his death in 1964.

Photo of Alvin C. York Agricultural Institute
Alvin C. York Agricultural Institute - Jamestown, TN

The Alvin C. York Agricultural Institute Historic District was listed on the NRHP in 1991 for its association with famed World War I hero Sgt. Alvin C. York. Constructed between 1927 and 1929, the York Institute consists of a high school and an elementary school that was constructed at the direction of Alvin C. York. The York Institute represents the culmination of York’s desire to provide local children with better quality of education. Located off U.S. Highway 127 near Pall Mall, the Alvin C. York Institute lies within an eight-acre parcel and contains three buildings and a sign spelling out “York Institute”.

Photo of Mark Twain Spring
Mark Twain Spring - Jamestown, TN

Mark Twain Spring – Located on North Main Street in Jamestown, this marker identifies a spring that early settlers used as a source of drinking water. The marker mentions that Mark Twains’ parents lived in Jamestown between 1827 and 1832 before moving to Missouri in 1835.

Photo of Old Fentress County Jail
Old Fentress County Jail - Jamestown, TN

The Old Fentress County Jail was listed on the NRHP in 1984 for its architectural and historical significance. Architecturally, the building represents one of the oldest examples of the use of quarry-faced sandstone as a primary building material. Historically, the Old Fentress County Jail is the oldest public building in Fentress County. Constructed in 1898, and served needs of the county penal system from 1898 to 1979. Original cells are intact for visitors to crawl in, close the door, and see what it was like to be behind bars. The site also houses the Fentress County Chamber of Commerce.

Photo of Gernt Office & Allardt Land Company
Gernt Office & Allardt Land Company - Allardt, TN

The Gernt Office was listed on the NRHP in 1991 for its association with Allardt’s commerce history and for its association with the town founder, Bruno Gernt. Constructed ca. 1898, the building served as Gernt’s office where he managed the land sales responsible for the development of the town of Allardt. Following Gernt’s death in 1932, the building continued to be used for commercial purposes by decedents of the Gernt family until the early 1970s.

Photo of Bruno Gernt House
Bruno Gernt House - Allardt, TN

The Bruno Gernt House was listed on the NRHP in 1987 for its historical association with Allardt founder, Bruno Gernt. Born in Dresden, Germany in 1851, Gernt immigrated to the United States in the mid-1870s as the spokesperson for a German colonization group. Gernt initially established the settlement of Saxonia in Sanilac County, Michigan before moving south to Tennessee. According to local tradition, Gernt received the inspiration for starting a new settlement in Tennessee following a visit to the Rugby Colony in nearby Morgan County. Soon afterward, Gernt became the land agent for Cyrus and James N. Clarke of Nebraska who held title to large tracts of land in the Cumberland Plateau region. As land agent, Gernt promoted settlement of the area and the exploitation of its natural resources. Through Gernt’s efforts, he helped settlers finance the purchase of land in the area that eventually developed into the town of Allardt.

Alvin C. York Farm

The Alvin Cullom York Farm was listed as a National Historic Landmark (NHL) in 1973 for its association with famed World War I hero Sgt. Alvin C. York. Located off U.S. Highway 127 near Pall Mall, the Alvin Cullom York Farm includes 16-acres that contain York’s post-World War I home, built in 1922, and nine outbuildings. York resided in this house until his death in 1964. The Alvin Cullom York Farm lies within the larger Alvin York Historic District.